Artificial Intelligence, Bots & Robots, Elon Musk

Humans vs Robots, who will survive

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInDigg thisPin on PinterestShare on TumblrShare on VK

It’s no wonder, then, that a brand-new study found that 43 percent of Americans think AI positions a hazard to the long-term survival of humanity. The very same research study found Americans’ leading AI-related fear is that it will remove jobs.
I’m not convinced that the velocity of AI will result in the huge loss of tasks that many headings warn of these days.
The fear of overpopulation was not a viewpoint or even a hypothetical. The world would be overpopulated within 20 or 30 years and, as a result, there would be enormous hunger and appetite– really, around the world catastrophe.
As a 5- or 10-year-old, I did not check out a lot of the science about this. I do keep in mind having a kid’s capability to imagine my future as starving to death. Overpopulation as a huge concern became accepted truth. Hollywood, as it is wont to do, jumped on the wagon and produced films like Logan’s Run, which depicted a world in which individuals weren’t permitted to live beyond the age of 30 as a method to fight overpopulation. Does anyone keep in mind Soylent Green?

Humans vs Robots, who will survive

Epidemic overpopulation never ever took place, and the worry turned out to be folklore. And so it goes.
Today’s folklore is that artificial intelligence will erase mass amounts of tasks for the common man. It is ending up being accepted reality that the development of fully functioning robots and the “maturing” of artificial intelligence will imply fewer tasks ahead. Forget that AI has been over promised for at least the last 25 years. My issue with the present fearmongering about robots and expert system is that it embodies an absence of faith in the capability of people (and capitalism) to adjust, not to mention we do not have even a degree of real analysis of how the AI motion picture is realistically going to play forward. We should constantly be mindful about individuals and posts (like this one) that proclaim the capability to see the future.
The capitalist system is not perfect, it tends to work much better than alternative systems, particularly with regard to its capability to adapt to altering forces in people’s habits. Issues about robotics changing human beings’ tasks are rational at a surface area level, and it may turn out to be real that if people are doing manual work and makers take over that work, there will be fewer jobs for those people. People who were blacksmiths eventually wandered into other jobs and companies– maybe those associated to developing roadways and tires.

The argument today is that AI somehow represents a higher or different scope of modification than did industrial machines. I ‘d argue that the relative rate of technological change over the last 50 years is much less than it remained in the approximately 50 years following the end of the Civil War, for instance. Is making a cars and truck drive itself more ingenious than creating the very first cars and truck or replacing a plow with a self-propelled combine harvester? There wasn’t much difference in the method individuals lived between the medieval period and the late 18th century. But can you imagine somebody born in 1865 who dropped off to sleep in 1890 a la Rip Van Winkle then woke up in 1910 to see automobiles, planes, electrical lights, movie cams and phonographs?
Even if you assume robotics will change a substantial quantity of the physical work that individuals do today, there will still likely be robot-building centers and a requirement for more software application development. When I was young, every family in my neighborhood was lucky to have even one tv set. Now, individuals have three and 4 sets or ginormous ones, and families have multiple automobiles and computers, even though these have actually ended up being more effective and effective and can do more.

The lack of faith in industrialism and in the ability of people to adapt is the kind of thinking that causes social engineering. For instance, Mark Zuckerberg now says the service is for the federal government to give everybody cash– a “universal fundamental income.” Richard Branson agrees. This is a social engineering option based upon an incorrect argument: That people affected by AI are not going to move or increase their skills, which they’re simply going to sit there and be wiped out. His concept would disincentivize people if it did anything at all. It reveals an absence of faith in the human spirit. It basically says to them, “We do not believe in you, therefore we are going to provide you cash due to the fact that you, unlike me, are too foolish or unfortunate to adapt.” I doubt this is Zuckerberg’s direct thought but, worse, it is the base presumption underneath his thought.
I was raised in a household of individuals who didn’t have opportunity, and I have actually been around hardship and around wealth, so I have actually seen this mindset before. It’s individuals who look down on others and think they’re too unintelligent to take care of themselves. Here’s Silicon Valley talking other Americans, “We appreciate you individuals and therefore we’re going to protect you from us due to the fact that we’re powerful and clever (and you’re not).” If you disagree with them, you get labeled as one of those rich people who don’t care about others. There’s absolutely nothing more harmful than a self-righteous individual who’s wrong. Except, maybe, a self-righteous capitalist who has actually so rapidly forgotten that amazing things happen when you mix change with the human spirit.

My problem with the current fearmongering about robots and artificial intelligence is that it embodies an absence of faith in the capability of people (and capitalism) to adjust, not to mention we do not have even a degree of genuine analysis of how the AI motion picture is reasonably going to play forward. Concerns about robots changing human beings’ tasks are rational at a surface level, and it might turn out to be true that if individuals are doing manual work and machines take over that work, there will be less tasks for those people. People who were blacksmiths ultimately wandered into other tasks and businesses– possibly those related to building roadways and tires.
Even if you assume robotics will change a substantial amount of the physical work that individuals do today, there will still likely be robot-building facilities and a requirement for more software application development. Now, individuals have 3 and 4 sets or ginormous ones, and households have multiple automobiles and computer systems, even though these have actually ended up being more effective and powerful and can do more.

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInDigg thisPin on PinterestShare on TumblrShare on VK

One Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *